The 1960s


 

It was half a century ago and yet the memories of The Sixties seem as fresh as ever. This group is all about recalling key moments – people, events, music – and sharing memories. Every month we agree on the next topic. The dilemma – and it’s a nice one – will be who or what or when or where to choose? The 1960s is such a rich and vibrant time to recall and relish, a time when Britannia was cool and London was swinging, when the world was colourful and positive and, for young people especially, anything seemed possible. The old rules and conventions were there to be challenged. They say “If you remember the 60s, you weren’t really there”. We say “Nonsense” and the course is already proving it!

◻︎ Frequency : Monthly
◻︎ When : Second Thursday, 1.30 – 3.30 p.m.
◻︎ Where : Grove Avenue, N10

Group Convener: Stephen Rigg
 

To join the group please complete the contact form below. This form may also be used to contact the Convener on all matters relating to the Group.

Coming up …

May 2019

Sounds of the Sixties: The story of Island Records, Mersey Beat and Psychedelia.


Other topics being considered by the Group

▪︎ More sounds of the Sixties: Tamla Motown, R&B, Folk, Jazz, Good Vibrations from California
▪︎ The printed word
▪︎ The outstanding TV commercials of the decade
▪︎ Theatre in the 1960s
▪︎ Hornsey 1968: The art school revolution

Our story so far …

April 2019

London in the 60s : from the grim to the glitz
 
We had an afternoon’s viewing enjoying two DVDs showing life in London in the Sixties. The first film, in grainy black and white, showed life in the first half of the decade. London was a city slowly being rebuilt after years of austerity. Everything seemed to be a continuation of the past and more of the same. In marked contract was My Generation, the film created and narrated by Michael Caine. This was all about Swinging London, a magnet for the young who, for the first time, felt free and bold enough to follow their dreams, rejecting the expectations of their parents’ generation. The film was in vibrant colour, had a great soundtrack and featured some of the main players: actors, designers, hairdressers, musicians, artists and photographers They did say that Swinging London was just 300 people but their effect was overwhelming, global and enduring.

March 2019


Swinging London at the London Fashion and Textile Museum
 
On the same day that Twiggy was made a Dame Commander of the Order of the British Empire for her services to fashion, the arts and charity, some of the 1960s group met at The London Fashion and Textile Museum in Bermondsey for the Swinging London: A Lifestyle Revolution exhibition. It presented design and fashion, explaining the style and socioeconomic importance of this period of time. There were fashion, fabrics and furniture from the period, largely the work of Mary Quant and Terence Conran. Some pieces looked charmingly outdated whilst others were as fresh today as when they were created. We all agreed that it was a most enjoyable journey back in time to when a cultural and lifestyle revolution swept through Britain, changing for ever the social landscape.

February 2019

Love was all around for the films of the 1960s
 
This time, fittingly on Valentine’s Day, we looked at the stars of the silver screen and at the influential new wave British film directors who influenced the decade.
 
Michael Caine was the subject of Carl’s presentation. A six-time Oscar nominee and winner of two, Caine has been Academy nominated in each of the last five decades. Throughout his acting career, he has shown versatility and in the 1960s was an English Army Officer (Zulu), a secret agent in The Ipcress File (a world apart from James Bond’s 007), a loveable rogue in Alfie (Oscar nominated) and audacious robber in the iconic The Italian Job.
 
Ian was our guide to the British New Wave directors, most with a background in TV and theatre, who delivered a gritty realism on screen. They were young, ambitious and challenged the established order of film makers and film making. They got out of the film studio and into the real world. They made landmark films which have stood the test of time, including This Sporting Life, The Loneliness of the Long-Distance Runner, A Taste of Honey, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, A Kind of Loving, Billy Liar (of whom, more later) and The L- Shaped Room.
 
Suave, sophisticated and dangerous: that was James Bond, the subject of Nicci’s talk. The first outing for Sean Connery in the role was in the early 60s with Dr No, followed by From Russia with Love and Goldfinger, for many people still their favourite 007 film. Fifty years on and 24 films later, the franchise shows no sign of losing its box-office appeal.
 
Stephen talked about Julie Christie, who starred in five of the decade’s biggest films and gained worldwide fame and an Oscar for her performance in Darling. Her others being Billy Liar, Doctor Zhivago, Fahrenheit 451 and Far from the Madding Crowd.
 
The piecing blue eyes had it for both Vivien and Linda who remembered the heart-fluttering effect of Peter O’Toole and Paul Newman respectively. Both fine actors who along with Omar Sharif made a lasting impression on them and the rest of the group.
 
It was great fun, we welcomed a new member to the group and all in all feel that we have done justice to films in the 1960s. Thanks again to Graham for his hospitality in hosting the session.

January 2019

Camera, Lights, Action
 
A new year and a new home for the group. We met at Graham’s house in Muswell Hill for an animated discussion on films of the 1960s. Stephen kicked off proceedings, championing the Carry On films, of which fifteen were released in the decade. “They may no longer be as funny but in their combination of end-of-the-pier innuendo, word play, bawdy slapstick and self-parody, they remain a cultural distillation of the national character.” (Ben MacIntyre, December 2018) and “Infamy! Infamy! They’ve all got it in for me!”, Kenneth Williams’ quote in Carry On Cleo was voted the funniest film one-liner in a poll by Sky Movies Comedy. Carry on Camping was the highest grossing film in Britain in 1969 and a data survey of 47,000 films has concluded, using an algorithm that calculates how often a film is referenced in subsequent movies, that the Carry Ons are the most influential British films of all time.
 
From the ridiculous to the sublime was how Graham introduced his presentation on 1960s auteurs. He explained that an auteur is a director, considered to be so influential that they are to the film as the poet is to the poem. He talked about the richness of European films of the period, highlighting Italian and French auteurs, as well as Spanish, Polish and British directors. He illustrated his talk with the opening scene of Fellini’s , a stylishly stunning film in black and white, which won the Oscar for Best Foreign Film in 1964 as well as the Oscar for Best Costume Design.
 
Carl gave the group an insight into Science Fiction films, in which he discussed the different aspects of the genre from dystopia, through alien invasion, apocalyptic/ post-apocalyptic and futurology to apotheosis. He illustrated his talk with some trailers for influential films of the period and showed some brilliant B movie posters.
 
Memories of movie-going in the Sixties were recalled, from Saturday morning children screenings to family outings to see Gone with the Wind, the suavely dangerous Sean Connery as James Bond, and South Pacific at the Finsbury Park Astoria. The excitement of seeing films starring our pop idols like Elvis, Cliff and The Beatles was relished.
 
After a couple of hours, it was agreed that we hadn’t exhausted the topic, so there could well be a sequel at a future monthly meeting with presentations including the afore-mentioned Bond, James Bond and Spaghetti Westerns.


▪︎ What we did in 2018