Upcoming walks 2022

  Members must not attend CEDu3a walks if they or a close contact have recently been diagnosed with or shown any COVID-19 symptoms, are awaiting test results or are self-isolating under Government guidance applicable at the time of the walk


DateWalkStatus
10 February1066 Harold’s Way
(Greenwich Peninsula to Erith)
Waiting list only
24 February1066 Harold’s Way
(Greenwich Peninsula to Erith)
Waiting list only
10 MarchHarcamlow Way
(Sawbridgeworth to Bishops Stortford)
Booking opens 21 February
24 MarchHarcamlow Way
(Sawbridgeworth to Bishops Stortford)
Booking opens 21 February
14 AprilSt Albans OrbitalBooking opens 28 March
28 AprilSt Albans OrbitalBooking opens 28 March
12 MayGreat MissendenBooking opens 25 April
26 MayGreat MissendenBooking opens 25 April

  No bookings accepted before the stated dates and times
 
  When booking a walk please only specify a date if there is unavoidable clash in your diary

Thursday 10 and 24 February 2022
1066 Harold’s Way (Greenwich-Erith)
10.5 miles / 17 km

  Fully booked. Waiting list only

Any sensible King heading from London to a battlefield rendezvous in Sussex would in all probability have marched his army directly down Watling Street to cross the Medway at Rochester. However, realising that a trudge along the hard shoulder of the A2 does not make for a particularly pleasant experience, the modern-day Harold’s Way takes a more pleasing route. The walk starts at North Greenwich in the shadow of the O2 and follows the broad riverside path. We pass modern apartment blocks in various stages of ‘cladding blight’ interspersed with working wharves and decaying warehouses before arriving at the iconic steel-clad hoods of the Thames Barrier. At this point, we leave the river behind and head south, following the Green Chain Walk as it climbs through Maryon Park, past Gilbert’s Pit ( a former quarry that displays one of the most complete geological sequences in London) and on into Charlton Park. Having climbed about 50 metres from the river-side, our route levels out and heads east, taking us past Woolwich Barracks and through Plumstead Common, before entering Bostall Heath. Allegedly once the haunt of highwaymen, with the obligatory reference to Dick Turpin, this large expanse of open woodland provides our second climb of the day as we reach a high point of 66 metres. The walk continues over the heath, crossing into Lesnes Abbey Woods, before descending a woodland path, which gives us an opportunity to view the ruins of the Norman abbey, founded in 1178 and ‘dissolved’ by Cardinal Wolsey in 1525. After our historical interlude, a climb through the abbey woods takes us to the suburb of Belvedere and a short street section before we re-join the River Thames at Erith Reach. A final stroll along the waterfront with the Queen Elizabeth II Bridge in the distance leads to Erith town centre and the end of the walk.

▷ Walk itinerary


    1066 Harold's Way #2 Waiting List Application Form


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    Thursday 10 and 24 March 2022
    Harcamlow Way
    10 miles / 16.3 km

      Booking open from mid-day 21 February 2022

    Starting in Sawbridgeworth, this is a gentle walk, with few inclines and surprisingly varied scenery. For much of the morning, we follow two waymarked routes, (the Three Forests Way and the Harcamlow Way) as they traverse the Essex countryside. Both are heading for Hatfield Forest Country Park, a national nature reserve and our lunchtime location. Hatfield Forest is undoubtedly the highlight of the day, providing not only lovely woodland and lakeside scenery, but also fascinating history.
     
    Close to the lake-side, is the grade 2 listed Shell House. This picnic room once entertained King Edward VII when he was still the Prince of Wales. But of perhaps greater interest, is that many of the shells used in its construction, originate from the West Indies and West Africa. No prizes for guessing then how the Houblon family (who had the Shell House built in the 1750’s) acquired their wealth.
     
    After lunch, our route turns to face west, leaving the forest behind and eventually taking us beneath the M11 and across a golf course to reach the edge of Bishops Stortford. A final short stretch through the quiet suburbs ends at the rail station, and frequent services back to London.

    ▷ Walk itinerary


      Harcamlow Way Booking Form


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      Membership No.




      If you are available both dates enter EITHER. Enter a preferred date only
      if there is as an unavoidable clash in your diary